Tourists Shine Spotlight On Bali’s Dog Meat

Revelations of Animal Cruelty, Poisoned Food Sold To Tourists

Balinese government agencies have called for an end to the dog-meat trade in Bali, according to Animals Australia, which sponsored a summit last week to discuss the killing of dogs for human consumption in the popular tourist destination.

The summit follows the ABC’s exposure of a four-month-long Animals Australia investigation that revealed tourists were eating dog, which had been brutally caught and killed.

“All in attendance recognized that such dreadful cruelty to dogs has no place in Balinese culture and it couldn’t be allowed to continue,” Animals Australia’s (AA) director of investigations Lyn White said.

dog meat Bali

Representatives of Bali’s Veterinary Health Office, the Ministry for Agriculture, and the Balinese Tourism Board drafted recommendations to end the trade.

The recommendations included law enforcement to prevent the sale of dog meat, and an emphasis on educating the public about the trade and its potential for spreading diseases such as rabies.

The animals are brutally caught and then butchered not far from the beaches visited by more than 1 million Australians every year.

Some of the animals are poisoned, posing a risk to humans that consume them, according to a leading toxicologist. (The pup below was fed cyanide-laced fish.)

dogs poisoned on Bali

Whilst eating dog meat is not illegal in Bali, killing animals cruelly or eating meat contaminated with poison is against the law, Animals Australia’s campaign director Lyn White said.

“The dog-meat trade breaches animal cruelty laws and food safety laws. That is a statement of fact,” she said.

In an investigation led by Animals Australia (AA), 7.30 has obtained evidence that dogs are being bludgeoned, strangled or poisoned for human consumption.

“Dog meat is essentially filtering into the tourist food chain [in Bali],” Ms White said.

“We are absolutely delighted with the recommendations from this summit,” Ms White said.

The recommendations are yet to be publicly endorsed by Bali’s Governor, Pastika. Bali’s Bureau of Public Relations has not responded to ABC’s request for comment.

“There is a long way to go … next steps and maintained momentum are all-important,” Janice Girardi, the founder of the Bali Animal Welfare Association (BAWA), said.

“Any new regulations need to be communicated widely … It must reach the children and the villagers, not just the leaders.”

AA’s Ms White said the swift response indicated “the seriousness with which they are taking the issue”.

“Concern for Bali’s beautiful dogs has seen thousands of people from around the world contact Balinese authorities pleading with them to shut down the dog-meat trade,” she said.

A week before the summit, Balinese authorities flatly denied the revelations of the dog-meat trade in Bali.

Bali’s Bureau of Public Relations said local health officials could not find “any restaurant selling dog meat,” despite evidence of the trade presented in the ABC report. Animals Australia hoped the summit was a turning point.

“We now have real hope that Bali’s unique dogs will be saved from this terrible cruelty. The recommendations from key officials were unanimous, so we now wait to hear the Governor’s response,” White said.

While circumspect, BAWA’S Ms Girardi said progress had been made.

“It is pleasing that both the issues and the need for change have gained recognition,” she said.

According to Animals Australia, more than 170,000 people have signed an online petition calling on Bali’s Governor to end the dog-meat trade on Bali.

Indonesia News

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Tips For Shopping In Indonesia

Tourists Get Better Deals When Speaking Indonesian

Shopping can be a nonstop activity in Indonesia because merchants are everywhere. In larger cities, such as Jakarta, visitors will encounter everything from luxurious shopping malls to children selling goods on the sidewalks. Items from around the world are available in Indonesia, including food, clothing, and toiletries.

Local arts and crafts of all types are fascinating and abundant. Some islands and artisans specialize in primitive styles and materials, while elsewhere, artisans make some of the most refined pieces imaginable. Batik cloth, wood sculptures and masks, gold, silver, and pearl jewelry are some of the most notable items found across the islands. It’s often advisable to wait a few days after landing in this country before buying too many souvenirs. Jet lag, excitement, and ignorance can impair a visitor’s taste in the first few days on the ground.

Indonesia tourist souvenirs

As visitors travel among the villages and islands, they can see many different arts and crafts. The most unique arts and crafts are found in the more remote islands and villages. If you find something that you want in these areas, get it while you can. You may not have a second chance.

Visitors to Indonesia have a variety of options available for shopping—from luxurious indoor malls in Jakarta to sidewalk stalls, which are found throughout the country. For the most part, the prices for products and services in Indonesia are very reasonable and the experience of dealing with local merchants is entertaining and rewarding.

Bargaining In Indonesian

In supermarkets, department stores, pharmacies, and other formal stores, the prices are fixed and bargaining is not a factor. Elsewhere, bargaining is customary and expected. In these situations, the art is to start with an offer that is about half the asking price and slowly increase your bid until a compromise is reached. It helps to smile while bargaining and remember that many vendors work hard every day just to feed their families. Therefore, don’t bargain beyond reason to save a small amount of money that you will never miss. Some travelers take bargaining on as sport and are willing to humiliate vendors in an attempt to get a lower price that they can brag about among friends and family when they return to the beach.

merchants on Kuta beach

If the price for a product or service isn’t labeled, it’s probably negotiable. In fact, most merchants will expect you to bargain. To start the bargaining process, point to the item or hold it up and ask:

Harga? (HAHR‑gah) = Price?

It pays to know numbers in Indonesian when negotiating. After asking a merchant for a price, listen closely for the answer that will come very fast. If you don’t understand the price the first time, the merchant may see the confusion in your eyes and rephrase it in English, because many salespeople at least speak English numbers. If all else fails, get out your calculator or pen and use printed numerals to negotiate.

Most shops are open every day between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. (with shorter hours on Sundays). In smaller towns and villages, shops may be closed between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m.

In an attempt to make a living, local people will offer you products or services that you may not want or need. In these cases, don’t be shy about saying no. The quicker you express your lack of interest, the better. In parts of Indonesia, you may encounter the more aggressive sales approaches.

Morning Markets

The majority of Indonesians don’t have refrigerators or freezers in their homes, which means they shop for food every day for their families. Therefore, there are street markets in most communities every morning where the locals (mostly women) shop for their daily meals. These markets are very colorful and worth a visit. These markets typically have fresh fish, meat, eggs, flowers, spices, fruits, and vegetables. They rarely feature arts and crafts, but they do offer some unique and colorful photo opportunities.

rupia Indonesia currency

Money Conversion Rates

Many travelers find it helpful to take a pocket‑size calculator along when shopping. It can help calculate prices with conversion rates. A calculator also can help shoppers and vendors communicate. If you don’t understand a price, ask the merchant to punch the number into the calculator or write it down. In return, you can use the calculator to convey your offer. Even though numbers sound differently in the Indonesian language, the raw numbers look the same as they would in your home country.

Credit Cards

Bigger stores will take major credit cards, but traveler’s checks are tougher to use because of fraud. If you wear a money belt, keep some small change in your pocket to avoid drawing too much attention to your money belt by reaching into it for every purchase.

If you don’t have much time for shopping, but want some authentic souvenirs, find one of the super stores. Sarinah, Batik Keris, Matahari, and others have numerous stores on the major islands and they carry merchandise from all over Indonesia. The variety of merchandise in these stores is impressive and their prices are reasonable.

Indonesian Phrases for Shopping

I want to go shopping. = Saya mau ke belanja (SYE‑ah MAH-oo keh BEH‑lahn‑JAH)

I like it. = Saya suka (SYE-ah SOO-kah)

How much is this book? = Harga ini buku? (BEHR-rah-PAH EE-nee BOO-koo)

I want to buy _____. = Saya mau beli _______ = (SYE‑ah MAH-oo BEH‑lee ________.)

That’s all = Ini saja (EEN-ee SAH-jah)

I already have one = suda punya (SOO-dah POON-yah)

I don’t want it = Tidak mau (TEE‑dahk MAH-oo)

I want a large one = Saya mau besar (SYE-ah MAH-oo BEH-sahr)

Learn more about bahasa Indonesia here.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Orangutan Expert Urges Travel To Indonesia Now

Deforestation Pushing Orangutans Toward Extinction

By Kelly Dinardo, New York Times

It was the orangutan’s eyes that first struck Biruté Mary Galdikas. “They look very human,” said Dr. Galdikas, an anthropologist and the president of Orangutan Foundation International. “They have a very strong gaze that will penetrate you,” she said. “It’s almost hypnotic.”

In the early ’70s, Dr. Galdikas traveled from Los Angeles to the Indonesian province of Central Kalimantan on Borneo island to study the red-haired primates. She has spent much of the last 45 years on the island, researching the orangutan and fighting to protect its habitat.

Birutie Galdikas Camp Leakey Indonesia

For decades, Dr. Galdikas was one of the few travelers to the inner region of Borneo. Getting there required an arduous journey and there was little infrastructure once one arrived. Government investment in the region and a smattering of eco-lodges and expedition companies are changing that.

The draw for most visitors is Camp Leakey, the research and education center in Tanjung Puting National Park that Dr. Galdikas established and named for her mentor, Louis Leakey, the paleontologist, archaeologist and anthropologist. Below are edited excerpts from a conversation with Dr. Galdikas about Kalimantan, Camp Leakey and the orangutans.

Q. How has Kalimantan changed?

A. In 1971 when I first went there, it was one of the wildest places left on earth. There were still headhunters on the interior. There were no roads. Rivers were the only highways.

How has tourism changed?

Tourism began in this area only about 20 years ago. I remember a pamphlet that the government issued that told people what a tourist was, what you did with a tourist. One of the wonderful things about Indonesia is the warm, gracious people. They treat tourists as guests.

We have encouraged tourism. We wanted to bring tourists to increase awareness of the orangutans. At Camp Leakey, we see up to 15,000 a year from all over the world. The local people saw them coming in and built up the tourism industry. The good thing is that the money stays in the area. The cooks are local. The guides are local. The boats are local. That’s one of the reasons the local people are so supportive.

Birutie Galdikas Camp Leakey

What do visitors do or see at Camp Leakey?

After you go into the education center, you can walk to the feeding station. Once a day, the orangutans are provided with fruit and they usually come through the trees to the feeding platform. The feeding lasts two hours and some people watch them the whole time.

The time to come is now. I went to see the gorillas in Rwanda and there are only a limited number of visitors allowed. There are very strict rules. It’s wise. The national park at Tanjung Puting has investigated what it would take to set up a system like that. There’s no limit at this point. It’s not necessary yet. You get very intimate encounters with the orangutans at Camp Leakey.

Besides increasing awareness, how has tourism impacted the orangutans?

So far it’s mainly been good. The tourism is controlled. You can only come to the feeding [at Camp Leakey]. You’re not allowed to wander alone in the forest. It enhances the value of the park to the local people and then they will fight for it. Tourism directly benefits the orangutans. It makes the local people want to protect them.

The main issue for orangutans in Southeast Asia is palm oil plantations. The forest needs to be cleared completely for the plantations.

Indonesia forest conservation

Orangutans spend 90 percent of their time in the tree canopy. When you cut down the trees, they have nowhere to go. We’re headed toward a point where most of the orangutans we see will be in captivity or at Tanjung Puting.

Indonesia Travel Update via http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/29/travel/birute-mary-galdikas-orangutan-expert-visiting-indonesia.html

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Indonesia Tourism On The Rise

Ecotourism An Untapped Market Across Indonesian Archipelago

Although Indonesia has many attractions for tourists – beautiful countryside, interesting cultures & historical remnants, beaches, nightlife in Jakarta and Bali, and much more – the country fails to attract a large number of foreign tourists. Yes, Indonesia may achieve its target of welcoming 10 million foreign visitors in 2015, but this figure is considerably lower than the number of tourists that visit neighboring peers Singapore (15 million) or Malaysia (27 million). Indonesia is not less beautiful nor less interesting than its neighbors. So, what has been blocking more rapid development of Indonesia’s tourism sector?

Mt. Bromo Java Indonesia

It is important that the tourism industry of Indonesia enhances its contribution towards the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) because it will trigger more foreign exchange earnings (as each foreign visitor spends between USD $1,100 and USD $1,200 per visit on average) while also providing employment opportunities to the Indonesian people (based on the latest data from Statistics Indonesia, the country’s unemployment rate stood at 5.81 percent in February 2015). It is estimated that nearly nine percent of Indonesia’s total national workforce is employed in the tourism sector.

Currently, Indonesia’s tourism sector accounts for approximately four percent of the total economy. By 2019, the Indonesian government wants to have doubled this figure to 8 percent of GDP, an ambitious target (possibly overly ambitious) which implies that within the next four years, the number of visitors needs to double to about 20 million. In order to achieve this target, the government will focus on improving Indonesia’s infrastructure (including ICT infrastructure), accessibility, health & hygiene as well as enhancing online promotional (marketing) campaigns abroad. The government also revised its visa-free access policy in 2015 (for further elaboration, see below) to attract more foreign tourists.

Sumatra tiger conservation

The number of foreign tourist arrivals in Indonesia has grown steadily between 2007 and 2015. This solid performance is supported by a reduction in terrorist incidents in Indonesia. Although small, there exists a radical Muslim community that not only believes Islam should be the sole guidance in life (and society) but is also willing to use extreme measures (violence) to reform and uproot established conditions. A series of terrorist attacks aimed at westerners (the 2002/2005 bombings in Bali and the 2009 Ritz-Carlton/Marriott bombings in Jakarta) managed to stagnate foreign tourist arrivals as a large group of westerners ignored Indonesia as a holiday destination in the months following such a violent incident (within a year tourist numbers recover). The 2009 Ritz-Carlton/Marriott bombings explain why growth of tourist arrivals in 2009 was limited. After 2009 there have not been any terrorist attacks aimed at westerners. This success is due to efforts of the country’s special counter-terrorism squad (Densus 88), which is funded by the American government and is trained by the CIA, FBI and US Secret Service. After 2009, when radical groups started to operate in smaller networks (which are more difficult to trace) attacks have been aimed at symbols of the Indonesian state (such as policemen), not on symbols of the western world.

In the World Economic Forum’s Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Report, which “measures the set of factors and policies that enable the sustainable development of the Travel & Tourism sector, which in turn, contributes to the development and competitiveness of a country,” Indonesia jumped from rank 70th in 2013 to 50th in 2015, an impressive improvement. This jump was caused by Indonesia’s rapidly growing number of foreign visitor arrivals, national prioritization of the tourism industry and investment in infrastructure (for example the mobile phone network now covers most areas of the country, while air transport infrastructure has been expanded). The report states that the competitive advantages of Indonesia are price competitiveness, rich natural resources (biodiversity), and the presence of several heritage sites.

orangutan conservation

However, the report also stated that Indonesia is not placing enough emphasis on environmental sustainability, resulting in deforestation and endangered species, while only a minimal fraction of the used water is treated.

The report also mentions safety and security concerns, specifically the business cost of terrorism. Another concern is that Indonesia lags behind Singapore (11th), Malaysia (25th) and Thailand (35th) in the ranking of the 2015 Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Report.

The lack of adequate infrastructure in Indonesia is a persistent problem, not only because its raises logistics costs steeply thus making the investment climate less attractive but also because it limits the smoothness of traveling for tourists. Infrastructure on Bali is great and acceptable in Jakarta (except for the grave traffic congestion) but outside Bali and Jakarta most of the country’s infrastructure is inadequate, particularly in the eastern part of Indonesia where there is a shortage of airports, ports, roads and hotels. The lack of inter and intra island connectivity means that a number of Indonesian regions that contain huge tourist potential cannot be reached easily.

marine tourism Indonesia

Besides infrastructure, education also forms an obstacle. Although on the island of Bali as well as in the luxury hotels of Jakarta most native people working in the tourism sector are pretty fluent in English (and sometimes even other non-Indonesian languages), in the more remote areas of Indonesia natives have difficulty to communicate with tourists. Therefore, a focus on the study of English would help to overcome this situation. This language barrier has been reason for a portion of Singaporeans to choose Malaysia as their holiday destination instead of Indonesia. Most foreign visitors that enter Indonesia come from Singapore, followed by Malaysia and Australia.

Most foreigners enter Indonesia at Ngurah Rai International Airport on Bali, the island that is the most popular holiday destination for foreign tourists in Indonesia. This island is home to most of Indonesia’s Hindu minority and offers tourists all sorts of Balinese Hinduism-related arts and culture as well as a lively nightlife and beautiful countryside.

The second main point of entry is Soekarno-Hatta International Airport, located just outside of the capital city of Jakarta. Many tourists start their holiday by staying a couple of days in Jakarta before traveling to other parts of Indonesia. Jakarta is also the economic center of Indonesia and although it is not allowed by law there are many foreigners that use a tourist visa (valid for 30 days) to participate in business meetings or events in Jakarta.

National Monument Jakarta

The third-most used port of entry in Indonesia is Batam, the largest city in the Riau Islands Province of Indonesia, across the Strait of Singapore. Batam has rapidly developed into an industrial boom-town and transport hub. The city is part of a free trade zone in the Indonesia-Malaysia-Singapore Triangle. Since 2006, Batam (together with Bintan and Karimun) form part of a Special Economic Zone with Singapore, implying that trade tariffs and value-added taxes for goods shipped between Batam and Singapore are eliminated.

In 2015 the Indonesian government granted an additional 45 countries visa-free access to Indonesia in an attempt to boost the tourism industry. Previously, citizens of these countries had to obtain a visit visa before entering Indonesia. In March 2016 the amount of countries for which residents are allowed to enter Indonesia without a visa was raised again through Presidential Regulation no.21/2016 on Exemptions of Visit Visa, meaning there are now a total of 169 countries that not need a visa to enter and stay in Indonesia (for a maximum period of 30 days). Meanwhile, the government also introduced a new regulation on yacht and cruise ships. This new regulation lifts cabotage rights for international cruises and yachts, meaning that international cruise liners can now lift and disembark passengers in 5 Indonesian seaports: Tanjung Priok (Jakarta), Tanjung Perak (Surabaya), Belawan (Medan), Soekarno-Hatta (Makassar) and Benoa (Bali). Previously, only Indonesian-flagged ships were allowed by law to lift and disembark passengers in Indonesian waters.

These policy changes were made in order to attract more foreign visitors. Although granting more tourists visa-free access to Indonesia implies that the country misses out on an estimated USD $11.3 million per year (as currently USD $35 is charged for a ‘visa on arrival’), it is expected to attract an additional 450,000 foreign tourists per year. Considering that each foreign tourist spends an average of between USD $1,100 and USD $1,200 during his/her holiday in Indonesia, the country will thus gain around USD $500 million in additional foreign exchange revenue each year.

Through its Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy, Indonesia promotes itself as a tourist destination in foreign countries with its “Wonderful Indonesia” campaign. It is important for the government to invest in such promotional campaigns to spread a positive image of Indonesia as most western countries mostly receive negative headline stories from Indonesia (for example radical Islam, natural disasters such as a tsunami or massive volcanic eruptions), causing an undue negative image of the country.

Rinjani volcano Lombok Indonesia

It is also important for authorities to build a magnetic brand for the country as a whole. While the island of Bali already has a strong brand that is widely known across the globe, Indonesia as a whole doesn’t have the same level of awareness and support. Bali and Jakarta have already seen a large influx of investment in recent years leading to excessive supply. Investors who want to establish hotels in these regions (as well as existing hotels) need to come up with original and creative new concepts to become market leaders.

Read The Story About Indonesia Tourism http://www.indonesia-investments.com/business/industries-sectors/tourism/item6051?

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm 

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Indonesia’s Indigenous Communities Embrace Ecotourism

Green Indonesia Helping Save Rain Forests

Six indigenous communities have launched an ecotourism initiative that would show off their ancestral forests. They hope to develop alternate economic models that local governments in Indonesia could embrace, other than extractive industries such as mining and palm oil plantations. The initiative, called GreenIndonesia, would ultimately help the communities secure the rights to their own lands, an elusive goal that they have long pursued.

Sumatra tiger conservation

Indonesia has the third largest area of rainforest in the world, and the Indigenous Peoples and local communities who live in and depend on these forests play an important role in conserving them. With global climate change challenges looming—deforestation is the leading source of Indonesia’s greenhouse gas emissions—the fourth most populous country in the world is searching for a green economic pathway to lift people out of poverty.

GreenIndonesia sees significant potential in community based eco-culture tourism—one recent study found that for 26 percent of the traveling population, sustainability and responsibility play a big part in their decision making.

muck diving Sulawesi

Indonesia is blessed with a more than 400 ethnic groups who inhabit the largest archipelago in the world, over 17,000 islands. The six partner communities of GreenIndonesia are:

  • The Sui Utik Indigenous Forest in West Kalimantan;
  • The Mollo Sacred Lands in Nausus, Timor Tengah Selatan;
  • The Paluanda Lama Hamu cloth weavers, in East Sumba;
  • The Guguk Indigenous Forest in Jambi, Sumatra;
  • The Sawai community in Seram Island, Maluku; and
  • The Jatiluwih community in Tabanan, Bali.

Through GreenIndonesia, women weavers from all over Indonesia connect, share knowledge, and keep their traditions alive. The communities work with many local plants to create unique colors and pay close attention to maintaining the environment where the vegetation grows.

The Sawai community, on the island of Seram, Maluku, have transformed themselves over the last decade from poaching endangered birds for illegal wildlife traders to sustainable forest managers of one of the best birdwatching havens in Eastern Indonesia. Other partners also have inspiring successes. The Guguk Ancestral Forest community, for example, has kept logging and palm oil expansion in their territory at bay. Their forests provide a sanctuary for the critically endangered Sumatran tiger, whose population has dwindled to about 250.

The communities hope to show that resilient and green economic development is possible when local community land rights and the integrity of natural ecosystems are equally protected. The national government has been supportive, endorsing the initiative and sponsoring a booth at Norway’s biggest tourism expo in early January. This support reflects the new government’s focus on addressing climate change and Indigenous community rights in an effective and fair way.

Indonesia Travel News via http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2015/01/23/greenindonesia/

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Australian Tourists Now Enter Indonesia Free

Australians Granted Free Entry to Indonesia For 30 Days 

Aussies will no longer have to pay for a visa on arrival in Indonesia. Late last week President Joko Widodo​ signed a decree waiving the $35 visa requirements for another 79 countries, including Australia, bringing the list of visa-free countries to 169.

“Indonesia’s decision to add Australia to the list of countries visa-free is smart and timely,” ambassador Paul Grigson said. “We expect it to add approximately 3.4 trillion Rupiah ($239 million) into the economy of Indonesia.”

Bali monkey dance

More than 1 million Australians already visit Indonesia every year, contributing 18 trillion rupiah ($1.8 billion) to the local economy. The visa-free policy is part of a plan to lure more visitors to Indonesia, as the government aims to attract at least 20 million foreign tourists to the country over the next five years.

Australians who wish to stay in Indonesia for longer than 30 days or to conduct “journalistic activities” are still required to apply for a visa in Australia.

Indonesia recorded a 19 percent increase in tourists from countries that received visa-free access in 2015.

In March last year, amid tension between the countries over the execution of Bali nine heroin smugglers Myuran Sukumaran and Andrew Chan, Indonesia removed Australia from a group of 45 countries whose tourist visa fees would be waived, blaming a lack of reciprocal arrangements.

In September, the Indonesian tourism minister again promised Australians would be granted visa-free access, before leaving them out of the policy that began on October 1.

In November the Australian government said it would introduce an option of a three-year, multiple-entry visa for Indonesian visitors to Australia in 2016 – an extension of the current one-year visa.

Mt. Merapi Java Indonesia

The government would also expand online visa lodgement to all Indonesian citizens by 2017, making the process of applying for an Australian visa simpler for Indonesian tourists and business people.

But Indonesia Institute president Ross Taylor said it was astonishing that while Australians would enjoy visa-free entry to Indonesia, the Australian government would still demand Indonesians pay $130 per person just to apply for a tourist visa.

“Then add to that we tell Indonesians to complete some 15 pages of questions per person,” he said. “And we wonder why so many Indonesians choose to travel elsewhere on holidays.”

Kuta Beach Bali

Indonesian Tourism News via: http://www.smh.com.au/world/australian-tourists-finally-granted-free-entry-to-indonesia-20160322-gnovx3.html#ixzz43kzYuC4D

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Indonesia Falls Short Of Tourism Target

Jakarta Terrorist Attack Takes Toll On Tourism 

Indonesia missed its target to attract at least 10 million foreign tourists in 2015 despite various promotion attempts, according to the Central Statistics Agency. Indonesia attracted 9.73 million tourists last year, in comparison to 9.44 million tourists in 2014.

Indonesia tourism

The report also showed that there were 913,828 foreigners who visited Indonesia in December, up from 777,976 visitors in November, but the number slipped from 915,334 visitors in December 2014.

Despite the setback, Indonesia aims to attract at least 12 million tourists this year and generate foreign exchange equivalent to Rp 172 trillion ($12.61 billion). Arief also said that the tourism sector must contribute at least five percent of gross domestic product (GDP) and contribute to the creation of 11.7 million jobs. Indonesia’s tourism sector contributes just four percent to the GDP now.

Indonesian language and words

“We should build a spirit that Indonesian tourism can beat Malaysia or Thailand. Tourism must become the main foreign exchange generator for Indonesia,” Arief said.

According to the minister, Indonesia will adopt a so-called “single destination, single management” concept this year to develop 10 priority tourist destinations including Borobudur in Central Java, Mandalika in West Nusa Tenggara, Labuan Bajo in Nusa Tenggara, Bromo-Tengger-Semeru National Park in East Java, Thousand Islands north of Jakarta, Lake Toba in North Sumatra, Wakatobi National Park in Southeast Sulawesi, Tanjung Lesung in Banten, Morotai Island north of Halmahera and Tanjung Kelayang in Belitung.

The concept — which according to the tourism minister has been widely adopted as an international technique to promote tourism  — allows for a specified authority to run and manage various tourist spots.

orangutan Camp Leakey

Indonesia faces a drop in tourist numbers, following the recent terrorist attack in central Jakarta. Southeast Asia’s biggest economy is now growing at its slowest pace since the financial crisis.

An Indonesian and a Canadian were killed, along with five attackers, while 20 people, including a Dutchman, were wounded. Two of the militants were taken alive. The attack could frustrate Indonesia’s ambitions to nearly double tourist arrivals to 20 million people by 2019. Some travel agents said they received calls from worried tourists, but they predicted that the effects of the attack would be short-lived.

Way Kambas Sumatran elephants

“This incident will definitely have an impact on travel to Indonesia, especially to Jakarta,” said Terence Cheong, director of Orient Travel and Tours, a travel agency based in Kuala Lumpur.

Indonesia Tourism Trends via http://www.jakartaglobe.beritasatu.com/business/indonesia-misses-target-10m-foreign-tourists-2015/

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Indonesia Promoting Marine Destinations

Tourism Plan Showcases Diving, Surfing, Wildlife

Indonesia hopes to double the number of tourists that visit from other nations by 2019. This year, the island nation will launch an initiative to upgrade several tourist destinations around the archipelago in a bid to lure tourists to destinations other than Bali.

scuba diving Indonesia

Top New Tourist Destinations Include

  • Lake Toba (North Sumatra),
  • Tanjung Kelayang (Belitung),
  • Tanjung Lesung (Banten),
  • the Thousand Islands (Jakarta),
  • Borobudur Temple (Magelang),
  • Mount Bromo (East Java), Mandalika (South Lombok),
  • Labuan Bajo (East Nusa Tenggara),
  • Wakatobi (Southeast Sulawesi), and
  • Morotai (North Maluku).

Komodo island Indonesia

Indonesia’s Ministry of Tourism has added Komodo Island as one of the major marine tourist destinations in the island nation. Other primary destinations in the list are:

  • Wakatobi in Southeast Sulawesi,
  • Derawan in East Kalimantan,
  • Raja Empat in Papua,
  • Nias in North Sumatra,
  • Mentawai in West Sumatra,
  • Ujung Kulon in West Java,
  • Anak Krakatau in Sunda Strait,
  • Tomini in Central Sulawesi, and
  • Bali West Nusa Tenggara
  • Lombok in West Nusa Tenggara.

Indonesia tourism

“The islands are the foundation of the blueprint for marine tourism development as we promote Indonesia,” Welly Rame Rohimone, acting head of the provincial tourism and creative economy office, said.

Komodo Island, the natural habitat of the Komodo dragon (Varanus kommodoensis), has been selected as one of the new seven Wonders of Nature. The tourist area is ideal for diving and cruise tourism. The Komodo dragon in Komodo National Park can be found on the islands of Rinca, Padar and Komodo. Komodo Island, with a land area of 390 square kilometers, has a population of over 2,000. The island has a beach with sand that appears pink as it contains a mixture of white sand and red sand, formed from pieces of Foraminifera.

sailing Indonesia

In 2015, Indonesia’s top ten source of tourists were Singapore, China, Malaysia, Australia, Japan, Egypt, Britain, India, Germany, and the US. Further promotions will be held in these countries in cooperation with the local government, tourism agencies, airlines, media, Indonesian embassies, and the Indonesian diaspora there.

Indonesia Tourism News via http://en.tempo.co/read/news/2016/01/13/199735509/Komodo-Island-Named-Indonesias-Main-Marine-Tourist-Destination

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Travel Companies Helping Orangutans

Travel Companies Helping Orangutans On Borneo

Khiri Travel Indonesia, Wow Borneo and Asia Transpacific Journeys have joined forces to draw attention to the thousands of orangutans and other species whose habitats are being destroyed by fires in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo.

orangutan conservation

According Khiri Reach, Khiri Travel’s not-for-profit arm, an estimated 10,000 orangutans, along with cloud leopards and hornbills, have been impacted by forest fires this year. And dozens of animals rescued by the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation (BOSF) are in need of shelter, medication and nourishment.

“We want to mobilize the support of partner organizations, not just in Indonesia, but across the region to help the orangutan, preserve forest habitats, and encourage a halt to the burning of forests,” said Pharatah Senapan, chief ambassador of Khiri Reach. “A long-term sustainable solution is needed to ensure protection for the habitat of this unique species.”

Birutie Galdikas Camp Leakey Indonesia

“The foundation welcomes initiatives on orangutan and habitat conservation from partners,” said a spokesman. “We are keen to fulfill the Orangutan National Action Plan to put all orangutans in the rehabilitation centers back in the forest by 2015.”

Orangutan conservation Borneo

Apart from a donation to BOSF, Khiri Reach has also launched an awareness campaign for staff and travel industry partners across Indonesia.

“We can’t stand still and not take part to help with the situation,” said Khiri Reach Indonesia spokesperson, Elske de Vries. “In fact, we believe everyone should join.”

Members of the travel industry and the public can support the BOSF’s rescue work by either donating funds online or adopting an orangutan at donation.orangutan.or.id.

Indonesia News via http://www.traveldailymedia.com/229643/travel-companies-unite-to-help-borneos-orangutans/

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Bali Now Served By Emirates Airline

Daily Non-Stops Already Serve Jakarta

Bali ho. Dubai-based airline Emirates officially launched a daily flight from Dubai in the United Arab Emirates to Indonesia’s most prominent tourism destination, Bali, with an inaugural flight on Wednesday.

The flight marked the commencement of Emirates’ non-stop daily flight to Bali, its second destination in Indonesia after Jakarta, the airline said. The EK 398 flight arrived in Bali at 9:40 p.m local time carrying Emirates’ top officials, journalists and passengers from 40 different cities from around the world, including Moscow, Frankfurt, Amsterdam and New York. Emirates will use Boeing 777-300ER airplanes for the fleet serving the Dubai-Bali route.

Mt. Bromo Java Indonesia

Barry Brown, divisional senior vice president of commercial operations East at Emirates, said Bali is a main tourism destination and an important market for Emirates as there was high interest in the island.

“We are pleased to now be able to serve this demand and contribute to the island’s economic and tourism growth. We also look forward to connecting passengers from Bali to Dubai and onward to more than 80 destinations in Europe, the Middle East, Africa and the Americas through one convenient stop at our world-class hub,” Brown said.

I Gde Pitana, resources development head at the Ministry of Tourism, welcomed the new route saying it would boost tourism in Bali — which recorded 3.7 million foreign visitors last year.

Bali monkey dance

“The island continues to attract tourists from around the world, and a direct route to and from Dubai with Emirates will help to increase access to other parts of the world, bringing new opportunities for travelers and businesses alike,” he said.

Bali is Emirate’s 146th global destination, adding to the airline’s routes in the Asia Pacific region which currently serves 18 destinations in 11 countries in Asia. The airline also provides Emirates SkyCargo service which offers 294 tons of cargo per week from Dubai to Bali and vice versa.

The cargo that could be carried from Bali included marine products such as tuna, household goods, leather goods and handicrafts which mainly will be delivered to European countries. Moreover, the airline said there are also household goods, pharmaceuticals and automotive parts will also be imported not only to Bali but to other cities in Indonesia, including Surabaya and Balikpapan.

tourism Lombok Indonesia

Emirates first included Jakarta in their international route in 1992 through Singapore and Colombo. By March 2013, the airline began operating a daily three non-stop flights a week from Jakarta to Dubai.

Indonesia Tourism News via http://thejakartaglobe.beritasatu.com/business/emirates-officially-opens-dubai-bali-route/

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia