Sulawesi Hit By Earthquake, Tsunami, Volcanic Eruption

Death Toll Tops 1,500 So Far

If bad luck comes in threes, Sulawesi is ready for some relief. It’s been ravaged by an earthquake and tsunami for a week, while one of many volcanoes on the island is spewing lava and ash. Call it an insult to the injuries already endured by local residents.

Last week, a shallow magnitude 7.5 earthquake struck in the neck of the Minahasa Peninsula, Indonesia, with its epicenter located in the mountainous Donggala Regency, Central Sulawesi. The quake was located 77 km (48 mi) away from the provincial Capital Palu and was felt as far away as Samarinda on East Kalimantan and also in Tawau, Malaysia. This event was preceded by a sequence of foreshocks, the largest of which was a magnitude 6.1 tremor that occurred earlier that day. Following the main shock, a tsunami alert was issued for the nearby Makassar Strait, but was called off half an hour later.

A localized tsunami struck Palu, sweeping shore-lying houses and buildings on its way. The combined effects of the earthquake and tsunami led to the deaths of at least 1,558 people. This makes it the deadliest earthquake to strike the country since the 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake, as well as the deadliest earthquake worldwide so far in 2018, surpassing the previous earthquake that struck Lombok a few months earlier.

muck diving Sulawesi

The Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics confirmed that a tsunami had been triggered, with its height reaching an estimated height of 4 to 7 meters, striking the settlements of Palu, Donggala and Mamuju along its path. The earthquake caused major soil liquefaction in areas in and around Palu. In two locations this led to mudflows in which many buildings became submerged causing hundreds of deaths with many more missing.

“It could be that this earthquake triggered the volcanic eruption, but the direct correlation has yet to be seen,” Kasbani, the head of Indonesia’s Vulcanology and Geology Disaster Mitigation agency, told online news portal Tempo.

More than 70,000 homes were destroyed or damaged by the earthquake and following tsunami that struck on September 28, launching waves as high as six meters that slammed into Sulawesi at 800 km/hour.

According to the Indonesian National Board for Disaster Management on Friday, the death toll from the quake and tsunami has risen to 1,571.

The head of Indonesia’s Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency – which has been accused of prematurely ending the tsunami warning during the deadly disaster in Central Sulawesi – has been asked to resign. It was alleged that another wave hit after the warning was lifted.

The death toll is expected to rise, as rescuers continue to sift through the ruins. Hundreds more could still be trapped under mud and rubble. The recent disaster has put disaster funding in the spotlight, as details emerged about agencies’ struggles to maintain tsunami buoys and earthquake sensors. None of Indonesia’s tsunami buoys has been operating since 2012, the spokesman for Indonesia’s disaster mitigation agency, Dr. Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, revealed on Sunday, citing a decline in funding.

Many children have been separated from their families and are in shock and traumatized following Indonesia’s devastating quake-tsunami, aid workers said on Thursday (Oct 4), as much-needed supplies trickled in to shattered communities.

The Indonesian government initially refused to accept international help, insisting its own military could handle the response, but as the scale of the disaster became clear, President Joko Widodo reluctantly agreed to allow in foreign aid groups and governments. It’s still difficult to get relief supplies to survivors battling thirst and hunger. Palu airport only accepted military flights in the early stages of the disaster. It opened to commercial services Thursday, with aid workers given priority.

The United Nations is seeking $50 million for immediate relief to help victims. The UN plan, published on Friday and developed in consultation with Indonesian government officials outlined how the humanitarian community working in the country will provide targeted, technical assistance. The UN plan aims to provide help to 191,000 people over the next three months. The Red Cross is sending three ships loaded with supplies, including field kitchens, tents, body bags and mosquito nets, while governments from Singapore to Britain have pledged help.

Indonesia islands map

Sulawesi, or Celebes, is one of the most beautiful destinations in Indonesia. It’s the world’s 11th largest island. With abundant beauty and natural riches, Sulawesi could become one of the major nature-based tourism centers in Southeast Asia. In fact, ecotourism can help the region recover.

Palu (PAH-loo) is the capital of Central Sulawesi. It’s dry, hot, and serves as the gateway to Lore Lindu National Park. Visitors can buy park permits at the park office in town or at field offices along the way. There is an interesting museum in town, the Museum Negeri Propinsi Sulawesi Tengah. Tanjung Karang is a nearby beach area with good snorkeling. More than 280,000 people reside in Palu.

Lore Lindu National Park (LOHR-reh LEEN-doo) is extremely remote and few people travel here. Attractions include large megalithic rock formations, high peaks, waterfalls, hot water springs, unusual birds, and a beautiful lake. Visitors can take short hikes in the park, but guides are required on longer treks that can last several days. Lindu is a collection of four indigenous communities—Anca, Tomado, Langko, and Puroo, which suround Lindu Lake. Just south of the city of Palu.

Sulawesi’s vast size and diverse landscape has yielded several distinct cultures. The rugged and remote interior helped isolate many traditional cultures, including the Torajah people, until the early 1900s. Meanwhile, other cultural groups on the island, such as the Bugis, have been seafaring fishermen and traders for centuries. Manado and Makassar are the major cities on the vast island.

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. All proceeds are donated to causes in Indonesia.

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Borobudur The Crown Of Java

Prambanan Also Near Yogyakarta

When scholars and historians speak of the world’s great Buddhist temples, most conversations include Borobudur, which means monastery on the hill. Borobudur is the world’s largest Buddhist temple and is most famous for its many stone-carved panels depicting the life and teachings of Buddha. The narratives, over a thousand in all, are part of the temple itself, helping to form the terraces that support the temple’s chambers. The massive monument consists of at least two million stone blocks. This monumental structure was constructed in the 9th century and it dominates an entire hill near Yogyakarta.

Some scholars believe that this massive structure is a gigantic textbook about Buddhism to help people achieve enlightenment. To read this Buddhist textbook one must walk more than two miles to unveil all of its massive stone pages. The walls of the galleries are adorned with impressive reliefs illustrating the life of Buddha Cakyamuni and his teachings.

temple Borobudur

Representing the existence of the universe, Borobudur perfectly reflects the Buddhist cosmos, which divides the universe into three separate levels. The three levels are Kamadhatu (world of desire), Ruphadatu (world of forms), and Arupadhatu (world of formlessness).

On the three uppermost terraces, 72 stupas circle the huge main stupa at the top of this monument. The circular form represents an eternity without beginning and without end, a superlative, tranquil, and pure state of the formless world. There are no reliefs on the three circular terraces.

All but the largest central stupas on the upper levels originally contained a life-size statue of Buddha, although many of these statues are missing or damaged from centuries of pillaging. There also are many alcoves along the lower levels, which contain similar statues.

Borobudur Java Indonesia

Despite its massive size and height, Borobudur was lost for many years. The temple was ultimately abandoned with the rise of Islam, and the halls that once echoed with the pilgrim footsteps of scholars, artists, and priests were overrun by the dynamics of volcanic ash and jungle growth.

Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles began reclaiming it in 1814, after he received a report about the discovery of a hill full of many carved stones.

In 1835, the site was cleared and the entire structure was reconditioned block by block. Unfortunately, in 1896 the Dutch colonial government gave away several artifacts to the King of Siam, including eight large containers of Borobudur stones, 30 stones with relief, five Buddha statues, two lion statues, several kala stones, stairs, and gates. In 1985, the temple suffered a bomb attack by Islamic rebels. The damage was repaired and UNESCO now lists Borobudur as a World Heritage Site.

Borobudur carvings

You can take the best photographs of Borobudur during the early evening, when the sun gives the stone a warm glow. When it rains, water pours out of the mouths of several gargoyles on the sides of the lower levels of the temple. Bus service to the monument is available from Yogykarta. Visitors do not need to wear a sarong to enter the complex. Borobudur is located in the province of Central Java, 40 kilometers northwest of Yogyakarta.

Prambanan temple Yogykarta

Prambanan is the largest Hindu monument in Indonesia. It was built around 850-900 A.D. The temple has been damaged by centuries of earthquakes, vandals, and other forces. Not long after its construction, the complex of temples was abandoned and allowed to deteriorate.

The reconstruction of the compound began in 1918. The main building was completed in 1953. Other shrines and compounds may never be reconstructed, since much of the original stonework has been taken and reused by local villagers.

Prambanan now is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the largest Hindu temples in Southeast Asia. It is characterized by its tall and pointed architecture and by the centerpiece structure, which reaches more than 47 meters high.

The compound consists of eight main shrines or candis and more than 250 smaller ones. The three main shrines, called Trisakti (three sacred places), are dedicated to the three gods Shiva the Destroyer, Vishnu the Keeper, and Brahma the Creator.

The reliefs along the twenty sides of the temple depict the Ramayana legend. This story is animated by the Ramayana Ballet, which is regularly performed during the full moon in front of the illuminated Prambanan complex. Located in central Java, approximately 18 kilometers northeast of Yogyakarta.

Mt. Merapi Java Indonesia

Mt. Merapi also is nearby. It’s one of the most impressive and destructive volcanoes in Indonesia. Gunung (mountain) Merapi usually is visible from Yogyakarta. Smoke constantly spews from the massive mountain, which reaches an elevation of 2,950 meters, (9,679 feet). Hikers can climb Merapi when it’s not too active. The hike takes plenty of planning and two or more days to accomplish. It’s advisable to join organized assaults that are led by locals. Ask your hotel for more information. It’s visible from Yogyakarta.

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia and speak the Indonesian language.

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Volcano Erupts On Lombok

Hundreds Of Tourists Missing On Mt. Rinjani

Almost 400 tourists are missing after a volcano erupted in Indonesia, spewing a massive column of ash into the atmosphere. More than 1,000 vacationers have been evacuated from the area, according to the country’s disaster agency.

Around 389 tourists are missing after the 3.7-km (12,224-foot)-high Mount Barujari volcano erupted on Tuesday afternoon, spewing an ash column 2km (6,560 feet) into the air. The crater is also known as the ‘Child of Rinjani,’ as it is located in the caldera of the better-known Mt. Rinjani.

Mt. Rinjani Lombok Indonesia

Disaster Mitigation Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said the tourists are mostly foreigners, and that the agency hopes to locate them to “find out their condition and to evacuate them immediately,” the New Zealand Herald reported.

Nugroho said the foreign and local tourists had been registered since Sunday to climb the mountain, leaving from Sembalun monitoring post, located about 11 kilometers (7 miles) from the crater. Officials believe they are still on the trails, as it takes around three days to complete a trek around the mountain.

About 120 tourists, mainly foreigners, have already been located and are heading down the mountain, according to Heronimus Guru, deputy operations chief at Indonesia’s Search and Rescue Agency, as cited by AP.

Nugroho tweeted a photo of some of the tourists who have already descended safely down the mountain. So far, there have been no reports of deaths or injuries.

Mt. Bromo Java Indonesia

The incident interrupted flights for several hours at Ngurah Rai International Airport in Bali, and Selaparang Airport in Mataram. Nearby farms and trees were coated in a thin layer of ash, but Nugroho stressed that nearby towns and villages were not in any danger.

Rinjani is one of about 130 active volcanoes in Indonesia. The area is prone to eruptions and earthquakes because of its location in the Pacific ‘Ring of Fire.’

Indonesia Travel News via https://www.rt.com/news/360912-tourists-missing-volcano-indonesia/

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

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Indonesia Racing To Develop Resorts On Lombok

Lombok Expected To Divert Tourists From Bali

The Indonesian government is impatient to see the completion of the Mandalika tourist resort development, which is also being built as a Special Economic Zone (KEK) to drive local economic activities and boost growth.

Vice President M. Jusuf Kalla, when inspecting preparations for the construction of four star-rated hotels in the area Saturday, asked PT Indonesian Tourism Development Corporations (ITDC) management to accelerate the development of Mandalika, which is being groomed as a world class tourist resort and special economic zone in Central Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara (NTB) province.

Lombok Indonesia snorkeling
The development of the Mandalika Special Economic Zone and Tourist Resort Area should be accelerated so that the local people could soon enjoy its economic benefits and improve their welfare, the Vice President said. The Mandalika KEK project was planned 25 years ago but several constraints had always hampered its realization, he said.

“The constraints included inadequate road infrastructure, the absence of airport, electricity and clean water supplies. But all these have been overcome so there is no reason to slow down the development of Mandalika,” he said.

West Nusa Tenggara (NTB) province is expected to have a world-class tourist resort comparable to Bali, when the Mandalika Resort Development project in Central Lombok District is completed.

The development of the US$3 billion Mandalika Resort, which is expected to attract one million tourists annually, began in October 2011. Then President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono inaugurated its groundbreaking. Sitting on a 1,175 hectare area in Kuta, Pujut subdistrict, Central Lombok, the Mandalika Resort will be developed into one of the national tourism destinations.

Mt. Rinjani Lombok

The development of the project was continued under the present government of President Joko Widodo (Jokowi). After all, the Jokowi government is launching the development of dozens of Special Economic Zones (KEKs) in various parts of the country to spur the peoples local economy and improve their welfare. The government is developing eight special economic zones (KEK) in various parts of the country and will later open seven additional zones to drive economic activities and help boost economic growth. One of the KEKs is the Mandalika zone which is also being developed as an international tourist resort.

“I want the development of the Mandalika KEK and resort area to be expedited. Sometime in the past, we faced three main problems, namely water supply, electricity and airport. That time, the airport was still in Mataram (NTB provincial capital). We need over one hour to reach Mandalika. But now, we can count it in several minutes only to arrive at Mandalika (as airport is already available),” the Vice President said.

The government will continue to develop the Mandalika area for it to become one of the countrys main tourist destinations comparable to the international tourist resort province of Bali and the Komodo Island, he said.

Lombok surfing

“Now, Mandalika has become more complete. After all, the development of this resort has been planned for 25 years,” Jusuf Kalla stated during his inspection of the Mandalika Resort.

The tourist resorts in many parts of the country should be able to attract foreign tourists, he said. For this, they should have many innovations in their development so that they would remain attractive to tourists and invite more investment.

tourism Lombok Indonesia

“The easiest effort to attract investment is by developing the tourism business because the capital needed for that purpose is not too big,” the Vice President said during an Indonesia Attractiveness Award 2015 event in Jakarta recently.

Indonesia Tourism News via http://www.antaranews.com/en/news/102007/indonesian-govt-wants-acceleration-of-mandalika-resort-development

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

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Indonesian Flights Held Hostage By Volcanic Eruption

Rinjani One Of Indonesia’s Most Popular Treks

Flights have been grounded across Indonesia due to ongoing eruptions from Mt. Rinjani. Rinjani is ejecting ash up to 14,000 feet and causing hazardous flying conditions in and around the airports on the islands of Bali and Lombok.

The eruption has caused airport closures for over 120 miles, including the Bali International Airport, where airplanes have been grounded and wrapped to ensure ash does not infiltrate the aircraft engines. To date, 6,000 passengers have been stranded Rinjani eruption.

Despite the significant disruption to air traffic in the area, this eruption is minor for Rinjani, which has had larger eruptions periodically. The last eruption was from February 2010 to May 2010 with a Volcanic Explosion Index (VEI) of 2. The Rinjani caldera (a crater formed by volcanic collapse or explosion) formed in the 13th century with a VEI of 7. This eruption was large enough to deposit ash and sulfur in the Arctic and is thought to may have triggered the Little Ice Age, a global cooling period starting around 1250 AD. This eruption was the largest in the past 2000 years and is a significant eruption in literature as the timing was coincident with humans learning to write.

Mt. Rinjani Lombok Indonesia

Since the 13th century, Rinjani has been known to repeatedly erupt at low levels that do not pose significant risk to local residents and has become a normal part of life in an archipelago with 127 active volcanoes. Rinjani is part of what’s known as the Pacific Ring of Fire, a string of volcanoes that wrap around the greater Pacific Ocean.

Approximately 90% of all earthquakes around the world occur as a part of this Ring of Fire. These eruptions are due to the slow spreading of the Pacific Ocean along the East Pacific Rise as part of global plate tectonics. 

Mt. Rinjani volcano Lombok Indonesia

What’s certain is that the volcanism occurring from subduction of the Pacific Plate underneath the Australian Plate will cause future significant eruptions along the string of Indonesian islands. With better technology and monitoring, volcanologists can hopefully better predict the likelihood of a large eruption and warn local populations across Indonesia.

Indonesia Adventure News via http://www.forbes.com/sites/trevornace/2015/11/06/flights-cancelled-across-indonesia-rinjani-eruptions/

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Indonesia’s Deadliest Volcanoes

Indonesia Has More Active Volcanoes Than Any Place On Earth

Indonesia has more than 400 volcanoes, including 128 active ones. The tallest, Kerinci on Sumatra, Rinjani on Lombok, and Semeru on Java, for example, reach more than 10,500 feet above sea level.

The country covers one of the most volcanic and seismically active regions in the world. The volcanic ash yields extremely productive crops, which lures people to risk their lives farming in the shadows of these dangerous mountains. Thousands of farmers and their families have lost their lives as a result.

Mt. Bromo Java Indonesia

These mysterious mountains now lure hikers and mountaineering clubs, which have sprung up in Jakarta, Bandung, and other cities. Adventure travelers from other countries also find these volcanoes worth the trip.

The most popular volcanoes to climb are:

  • the twin volcanoes of Gede and Pangrango in West Java;
  • Semeru and Kelud in East Java;
  • Merapi in Central Java; and
  • Rinjani on Lombok.

On rare occasions, expeditions are made to the snow-covered summit of the Jayawijaya Range in Papua. Although it was not formed by volcanic activity, it is the highest point in Indonesia and one incredible adventure at 5,050 meters (16,000 feet).

Mt. Merapi Indonesia

Indonesia’s most famous volcano is Krakatau (known in the Western world as Krakatoa) in the Sunda Strait, between Java and Sumatra. When it blew up in 1883, the explosion and its after-effects circled the world. This volcano and many others have killed more than 150,000 people in Indonesia over the last 200 years.

Indonesia’s Deadliest Volcanic Eruptions 

Mt. Tambora, Sumbawa: In 1815, it killed 92,000 people. This eruption was greater in size and power than the more famous eruption of Krakatau. About 10,000 people were killed directly as a result of eruptions and ash falls, while about 82,000 were subsequently killed by starvation and disease. Lake Toba formed in its massive caldera.

Lake Toba Sumatra Indonesia

Mt. Krakatau, Sunda Strait: This well-known volcano erupted repeatedly over August 26-27, 1883. The northern part of the island vanished into the air and sea. It killed more than 36,000 people, mostly those who lived on the neighboring islands of Java and Sumatra. The massive tsunamis caused by the explosion surged 10 miles inland on these two islands to kill most of the victims. The explosions were heard 3,000 miles away and the shock was felt as far away as California, 9,000 miles from ground zero. Since 1925, this volcano has visibly been regenerating itself and is violently active again.

anak krakatau Indonesia volcano

Mt. Kelut, East Java: In 1586, Kelut (also called Kelud) erupted and killed about 10,000 people. Most of the victims were killed by lahars—violent mudflows comprised of volcanic ash and debris saturated with water from the volcano’s crater lake. In 1919, this volcano erupted again and killed more than 5,000 people.

Mt. Galunggung, West Java: In 1882, this volcano erupted and killed about 4,000 people with mudflows and hot ash.

Mt. Awu, Sangihe Besar Island in North Sulawesi: In 1711, Awu erupted and killed more than 3,000 people. In 1856, it erupted again and killed about 2,800 people. In 1892, it erupted again and killed about 1,500 people. In 1812, this deadly mountain killed another 960 people.

Mt. Merapi, Central Java: In 1672, Merapi, which means mountain of fire, erupted and killed about 3,000 people. In 1930, Merapi erupted again and killed about 1,300 people in the valleys below. In 1994, a scorching heat cloud from the volcano killed 66 villagers and farmers living on its slopes.

Mt. Papandayan, West Java: In 1772, this volcano killed about 2,900 people with its ash flows.

Bali pura besakih

Mt. Agung, Bali: On March 17, 1963, an eruption blew the top off of the volcano and killed nearly 1,200 people. Agung is the island’s highest and most sacred mountain.

gunung Raung Indonesia East Java

Mt. Raung, East Java: In 1638 this volcano erupted and killed about 1,000 people. This volcano is active again now and disrupting travel across Java and Bali.

Mt. Iliwerung, Lomblen Island, which lies between Flores Island and Alor Island, East Nusa Tenggara Province: In 1979, this remote volcano erupted and killed about 500 people.

Mt. Semeru, East Java: In 1965, Semeru killed more than 250 people. This is the highest mountain on Java. In 1981, Semeru killed another 250 people.

Mt. Kelut, East Java: In 1966, Kelut killed more than 200 people. In 1966, Kelut killed another 90 people.

Mt. Dieng, Central Java: In 1979, this volcano killed about 150 people. The Dieng volcanic complex in Central Java Province consists of two main volcanoes and about 20 smaller craters, several of which emit poisonous gas.

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

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Lombok A Diverse Tourist Destination

Island Offers Beaches, Golf, Waterfalls, Volcano Treks, History

Lombok is often compared to Bali. The neighboring islands have many similarities and many differences. They are only about 20 miles apart. Lombok has much in common with Bali, but it is less known, less commercialized and visited less by world travelers. It is working to increase its visibility and appeal.

Both islands have Hindu and Muslim influences, but in opposite proportions. Both islands have beautiful highlands and white sandy beaches, but Lombok is quieter and dryer than Bali. The largest city on the island is Mataram.

Lombok beaches

Until 1987, few visitors made the trip to Lombok. Today, Lombok is growing in popularity, but it is still relatively quiet and undeveloped. Tourism is already is the second-largest industry on Lombok. Mount Rinjani, beautiful coastlines, coral reefs, and stunning waterfalls highlight the list of popular destinations on Lombok.

History

The Gelgel Balinese Kingdom conquered Lombok in the early 18th century, which brought a large population of Balinese to the island. The Balinese population of Lombok today consists of about 300,000 people. The Balinese have influenced the Wektu Telu religion of Lombok with the Hindu religion.

The Dutch first visited Lombok in 1674 and settled the eastern part of the island. The Dutch left the western half of the island to be ruled by a Hindu dynasty from Bali. The Sasak people of Lombok were restless under Balinese rule and a revolt began in 1891. The revolt ended three years later with the annexation of the entire island to the Netherland’s East Indies. 

The People and Language Of Lombok

About 2.5 million people reside on Lombok. About 85 percent of the residents are Sasak, who follow a mixed religion comprised of Islam and animism. The other 10 percent of the people who live on Lombok are Balinese and a small fraction is Chinese, Arab, Javanese, and Sumbawanese. About 90 percent of the people in the west are farmers. They grow rice, soybeans, tobacco, and other crops. The Sasak language belongs to the Bali-Sasak-Sumbawa family of languages.

Lombok’s Diverse Geography and Geology

Lombok is part of the chain of the Lesser Sunda Islands, with the Lombok Strait separating it from Bali to the west. The Alas Strait separates Lombok from Sumbawa to the east. The Lombok Strait is part of the Wallace Line—the dividing line between the fauna of Asia and the distinctly different fauna of Australasia.

Mt. Rinjani

The island’s topography is dominated by Mount Rinjani, a massive volcano that rises 12,200 feet out of the ocean. It is the second-largest volcano in Indonesia and it often is shrouded in clouds. The most recent eruption of Rinjani was in 1994. The volcano, and its sacred crater lake, is protected by Rinjani National Park, which was established in 1997. The towering volcano collects a great deal of rainfall, which tumbles down the mountain through a series of cold and cascading waterfalls below.

Most of the southern part of the island is a fertile plain where corn, rice, coffee, tobacco, and cotton are grown. However, parts of the southern side of the island are too arid to produce healthy crops.

My Favorite Temple On Lombok

Pura Batu Bolong (POOR-rah BAH-too BOH-lohgn ): This Hindu sea temple is one of the most interesting temples on Lombok. It sits on the rocky coast facing Bali’s holy mountain, Gunung Agung, while constantly absorbing large waves from the sea.

Batu Bolong temple Lombok Indonesia

It is located between Mataram and Senggigi. Visitors must wear a sash around their waist to enter the temple. For a small donation, you can borrow a sash from the attendant. A hole in the rock under the temple lets waves come through, which adds to the site’s charm. Located between Mataram and Senggigi.

Arts, Crafts, and Culture

Lombok is famous for its baskets and pottery. However, its artisans don’t use the bright colors found on Balinese art. Local artisans weave baskets tight enough to hold water. The unique local pottery often features inlaid eggshells and leafs to create an artistic flair. Some artisans weave basket cases around the pottery for an unusual effect. Local artisans incorporate geckos on much of their work because they believe that geckos bring them good luck.

On Lombok and Bali, you can tell the married women from the single ones by looking at the flower behind their ears. If the flower is placed behind the left ear, the woman is not married. A flower behind the right ear indicates that a woman is married. In addition, people on Lombok never wear yellow because they believe it is bad luck.

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Sumatra On High Alert Over Volcano Activity

Indonesia Has Most Active Volcanoes

The alert status for one of Indonesia’s most active volcanoes has been raised to the highest level after it repeatedly sent hot clouds of gas down its slope following a series of eruptions.

Mount Sinabung in North Sumatra province unleashed fresh volcanic ash and gravel as high as 5000 meters and searing gas down its slope up to 2km, said a government volcanologist, Surono, who like many Indonesians uses one name.

Mt. Bromo Java Indonesia

The 2600-meter-high mountain has sporadically erupted since September after being dormant for three years.

“We are in a situation of high alert due to the danger of searing gas,” Surono said, adding that authorities had urged people to stay at least 5km away from the crater.

About 12,300 evacuees from eight villages around the mountain were packed on Sunday in crowded government camps away from the fiery crater, while more than 6000 others fled earlier to temporary shelters in 16 safe locations, said National Disaster Mitigation spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho.

Flores Indonesia

Transportation Ministry spokesman Bambang Ervan said airlines had been notified to avoid routes near the volcano.

The volcano’s last eruption, in August 2010, killed two people and forced 30,000 others to flee. It caught many scientists off guard because it had been quiet for four centuries.

Mount Sinabung is among around 129 active volcanoes in Indonesia, which is prone to seismic upheaval due to its location on the Pacific “Ring of Fire,” an arc of volcanoes and fault lines encircling the Pacific Basin.

Mt. Merapi Java Indonesia

Source: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/latest-news/indonesia-raises-volcano-alert-level/story-fn3dxix6-1226767459979#sthash.Z1kayvM2.dpuf

Indonesia tourism marketing and public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Volcanic Eruption Prompts Evacuation Of Sumatra Villages

Sumatra Has Many Active Volcanoes

Indonesian authorities evacuated people at four villages within 3 kilometers of Mount Sinabung, in North Sumatra, after the volcano erupted, according to the National Disaster Management Agency.

Mt. Bromo Java Indonesia

The government raised the status to stand by, the second-highest level, last night after the mountain spewed ash as high as 7,000 meters and the number of volcanic quakes increased, Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, spokesman at the disaster agency said by phone. He didn’t provide the number of people evacuated.

Mount Sinabung is located about 40 miles southwest of Medan, the provincial capital of North Sumatra. About 13,000 people were evacuated when the volcano erupted in September.

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Source: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-11-03/sumatra-volcano-eruption-prompts-indonesia-to-evacuate-villages.html

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